Five Great Holy Trinity Songs

Five Great Holy Trinity Songs

Traditional:
My two favorite hymns for Holy Trinity Sunday are “Come, Now, Almighty King” and “Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty”; I probably don’t need to say much about these hymns because the circles I run with and the majority of the people reading this BLOG are infinitely familiar with each song.  So let’s move on.

Blended:
I have two song recommendations that are getting old and are well used but I like them for a particular reason.  The two songs are “Father I Adore You” by Terrye Coelho Strom and “Glorify Thy Name” by Donna Adkins.   I like these songs for one main reason – they do a wonderful job at voicing our equal praise to each person of the Trinity – the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.  The song lyrics show no favoritism between the three persons of the Godhead and I think this is a valuable thing to consider on Holy Trinity Sunday because most of us tend to cling closely to Jesus, I know that I do, and there’s nothing wrong with this; but I think that we also need to take time once in a while to show equal worthiness to all three persons in the Trinity.  The other thing that I like about these songs is that the lyrics and melodies are so simple that most people can sing them from memory without even looking at a book, a song sheet, or at a screen.  Even if you’ve never sung these songs before, you will be able to sing it this way after the first verse.  This also, is a valuable attribute to consider because we sing better when we can look forward, chins up and not having to be concerned about reading lyrics and musical notation.  Either of these songs are a wonderful complement to the recitation of the Athanasian Creed.

Here are the lyrics for each piece:

Father, I adore You (LAPPY #67)

Father, I adore You, Lay my life before you, how I love you.
Jesus, I adore You, Lay my life before you, how I love you.
Spirit, I adore You, Lay my life before you, how I love you.

©Copyright 1972, Maranatha! Music, Terrye Coelho Strom

Father I Adore You can also be sung as a round, and as an added benefit most children know this song as well, probably from VBS.

Glorify Thy Name (BOB #66 & LAPPY #86)

Father we love you, we worship and adore you.  Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.
Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.
Jesus we love you, we worship and adore you.  Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.
Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.
Spirit we love you, we worship and adore you.  Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.
Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name, Glorify Thy Name in all the earth.

©Copyright 1976, Maranatha! Music, Donna Adkins, CCLI #1383

New (Contemporary):
My recommendation for a new piece of music would be Michael Schroeder’s rendition of the classic hymn “Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow.”  His arrangement gives equal praise to the Father, Son and Holy Spirit and he even fit in the expression “three in one” which is a great lyric to be expressing on Trinity Sunday.
As an added bonus for you guitarists, here’s a few hints to nail this piece:

For the opening riff, noodle around between these two chord fingerings:

3×0033 changing to 3×0032 and really emphasize the change on the first string which is actually bouncing  between a G5  and a G maj7 (without the third) – it’s pretty simple but effective; the key is to get the timing which you can only obtain by listening to the original and practicing along with it.  You can actually play this riff after the first, third and forth line of each verse to fill in the gap between the lyrics.  It does a nice job of drawing attention to the lyric that has just been sung.
The second hint is to do a reverse rake (pull up on the last four strings – one at a time; faster than an arpeggio but slower than a strum) after the second line of each verse.  The chord is a Dsus so you’ll be pulling up on these notes:

E string – 3rd fret
B string – 3rd fret
G string – 2 nd fret
D string – open

I don’t know if this is how Schroeder (or his band members) actually play these riffs but my interpretation should be a quick and easy way of getting close to his sound.  This is one of those songs where you can lead the congregation with only a guitar!

You can hear the piece here:

Used with permission and heartfelt thanks go to Michael for sharing.   www.michaelschroeder.com

One more thing of interest here; at least to me.  On Schroeder’s CD he has included the chord sheets but he has arranged this particular chord sheet in a peculiar way.  It’s actually set up like a hymn which is an interesting twist given that the song is a modern arrangement of a hymn.  You’ll have to get a copy of the CD to see what I am referring to; and now you also know a few of the musical licks to get your strumming to sound like the original.

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