Four Living Creatures Singing

Four Living Creatures Singing

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!

That’s an entire song you know.

Over, and over, and over.

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!

At infinitim. Countless. Numberless. Multitudinous. Innumerable. Myriad. Boundless. Endless. Inexhaustible. Timeless and dateless. Limitless and unbounded. Just like God himself.

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; who was, and is, and is to come!

There is simplicity.
There is transcendence.
There is a focus on the right things and not on ourselves.
There is awe and wonder.
There is worship.
There is no mention of style or accompanying instruments.
We do not know the tune.
The words are profound.
There are no structured verses, choruses, bridge and CODA.
There are not a lot of words so we can learn and memorize it easily.
There is lots of repetition.
There is wisdom.
There is power.
There is holiness.
Everyone can understand the lyrics.

Who is singing this beauty? Of course it is the four living creatures addressing God in Revelation 4:8.

And finally, there are indeed lessons to be learned here. I know leaders in the contemporary churches who speak negatively of the repetition found in our traditional liturgies on one hand, and I hear from traditionalists about too much repetition in the newer music.

Repitition is Angelic!

As the story goes, there was a heated debate going on in one fundamentalist church over repetitious praise songs and why they should be avoided. After hours of debate, they concluded that these songs with limited lyrics and unbounded repetitions are to be avoided. They then concluded their gathering with a hearty singing of Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus.”

Hallelujah!

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